Benign Protection from Bites

Outdoor Hazards

Nature is a paradise for many people, whether they are vacationing at the seaside, enjoying a party in the park, walking in the woods, or just spending time in their own garden — as long as the place isn't swarming with insects that have it in for them. Often enough, however, hungry mosquitoes, ticks, biting houseflies, and horseflies lurk in these places. They mercilessly throw themselves at any uncovered part of the body, crawl into sleeves and past necklines, and even bite through thin clothing. They sink their probosces deep into the skin and feast on the blood of their victims. Afterward, the bite can itch and burn for days or even weeks, and the red marks left behind don't look very sexy either. But even worse than the pimply-looking skin and constant itching is the danger of catching an illness such as malaria, dengue fever, borreliosis or meningitis. That’s because it’s not uncommon for the insects and ticks to be carrying the pathogens responsible for these diseases, which can be life-threatening for human beings.

There are many tips and tricks for protecting against mosquitoes and other voracious blood-feeding insects: switch off the light, burn incense, eat garlic, etc. But unfortunately, most of them don't work. That's because the pests are attracted by carbon dioxide and the odor of a whole assortment of bacteria that naturally protect the skin. Long showers don't help either. Perfumes and deodorants contain ingredients that could actually provoke the little vampires even more. This is in contrast to the active agent Saltidin, which is found in many common insect repellents and is manufactured in Dormagen by the LANXESS subsidiary Saltigo. "Saltidin lies on the skin like a film," says Detlef Petersen, who oversees the global Saltidin business of Saltigo. "The mosquito doesn't smell anything any more." The insect repellent must therefore be applied everywhere, because only in the places covered by Saltidin is the skin truly protected from attacks by bloodthirsty insects and ticks. Petersen knows that from his own experience. "I always have to test out the new things myself," says the manager with a grin. "I get extra formulations prepared by our applications engineer for that."

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